Baan Teelanka, The Upside Down House

The Upside Down House

The latest tourist attraction in Phuket has literally turned itself on its head in order to attract attention. It is called Baan Teelanka which translates as the Upside Down House. As soon as you arrive and walk past the upside down car and upside down garbage bin you know that you are in for an unusual adventure. And it’s not only the garden that is in reverse order. The house itself is fully furnished and everything that should be on the floor is now fixed to the ceiling. Taking pictures in the house can prove to be fun but you need to think about the shots first. Any picture that you take needs to be flipped around so that you are upside down. But the furniture in the house will then be the right way up. A lot of fun.

More photos →

Wat Chaiwatthanaram

Wat Chaiwatthanaram

One of the most visited historical site of Ayutthaya, Wat Chaiwattanaram rests on the bank of the Chao Phraya river, to the west of the city island. The temple was ordered to built in 1630 by King Prasat Thong to honor his mother, featuring the architectural style influenced by Angkor temple in Cambodia—its unique feature is a large, central prang (Khmer-style pagoda) surrounded by smaller prangs, symbolizing Mount Sumeru, the gods’ mountain according to Hindu belief. The lighting at night makes the temple even more exotic and beautiful.

More photos →

Paknam Observation Tower

Paknam Observation Tower

This is the Paknam Observation Tower (หอชมเมืองสมุทรปราการ) in Samut Prakan. They say that the 179.55 meter high observation tower will be completed within two years. The tower will contain educational facilities for children and local people that will include a library and museum. There will also be a viewing platform at the top.

More photos →

Wat Phra Sri Sanphet

Wat Phra Sri Sanphet

The most iconic temple building in Ayutthaya is Wat Phra Si Sanphet (วัดพระศรีสรรเพชญ์). It was built in 1491 and was the only temple located inside the compound of the Grand Palace. Like The Temple of the Emerald Buddha in Bangkok, this temple too didn’t have any resident monks. During the height of the Ayutthaya Kingdom, this was the largest temple in the city. Ashes of some Ayutthaya kings were stored here. It was damaged and left abandoned after the collapse of Ayutthaya in 1767 but the remaining structures still help us picture the temple in its former condition.

More photos →

Royal Elephant Kraal Pavilion

Royal Elephant Kraal

Situated in the north of the Ayutthaya Historical Park, the Royal Elephant Kraal Pavilion was used as a royal seat for the monarchs to witness the elephant round-up. Elephants were the essential animals for wars and transports in the past, and there were often a round-up ritual gathering wild elephants to be trained for wars and transportation. No longer carried on, the last time the round-up took place was in 1890 to welcome Nicholas II of Russia during his visit to Siam.

More photos →

Government House

Government House

The Government House (ทำเนียบรัฐบาล) is the offices of  the Prime Minister of Thailand and the cabinet ministers. It also contains conference rooms and is used for state functions and receptions of foreign guests. It was designed by Italian architects with building work commencing in 1923. Other buildings date back to the 1940′s. The main building carries a golden dome housing a statue of Phra Phrom (Brahma) and its façade resembles that of the Ca’ d’Oro Palazzo in Venice.

More photos →

The White Temple

 The White Temple

One of the most beautiful temples in Thailand, done in a modern contemporary style, is undoubtedly Wat Rong Khun. This temple, which is in Chiang Rai in Northern Thailand, is more well-known among foreigners as The White Temple. The temple is located in Ban Rong Khun, about 13 kilometres south-west of Chiang Rai city along Phahonyothin Road. It is the brainchild of Thai artist Chaloemchai Khositphiphat who started building it back in 1998.

More photos →

Statue of Luang Pu Thuat

statue of Luang Pu Thuat

A famous pilgrimage site in Hua Hin is the statue for Luang Pu Thuat (หลวงปู่ทวด) at Wat Huay Mongkol. Luang Phu Thuat was born in 1582 and is said to have performed miracles. Amulets created in his image are said to have great protective powers and will protect you from things like car accidents. Older amulets are sold for high prices. The statue in Hua Hin is the largest in Thailand.

More photos →

Standing Buddha at Khao Takiab Beach

Standing Buddha at Khao Takiab Beach

If you are visiting Hua Hin, it’s worth driving south just a little way to Khao Takiab Beach. At the southern end there is a rocky hill with a temple at the top. It’s well-known for the monkeys that roam around the temple grounds. At the foot of the hill, facing out to sea, is this 19 meter high Standing Buddha. It has been photographed many times from the beach by tourists, but I bet you have never seen it from this angle.

More photos →

Wat Phai Rong Wua

Wat Phai Rong Rua

Wat Phai Rong Wua (วัดไผ่โรงวัว) in Suphanburi has been described as a kind of Buddhist version of Disneyland without the rides. As well as literally hundreds of Buddha images in all shapes and sizes, there is also an extensive Buddhist Hell Garden where you can see what will happen to you if you commit certain sins. For Buddhists, the temple grounds is also where they can visit replicas of all of the places that mark important periods in the Buddha’s life such as his place of birth, enlightenment, the first sermon and his passing into nirvana. The giant seated Buddha is believed to be one of the biggest cement Buddha’s in the world.

More photos →